CRA Compliance

March 11, 2017

Changes to the Principal Residence Exemption (Part 2 of 2)

In my previous blog, I introduced the Principal Residence Exemption, or PRE. There is a new reporting requirement on the sale of the principle residence. I’ll discuss it briefly here. As always, discuss complex tax issues with a tax accountant. Tax is often the biggest cash disbursement for most years, so proper planning may save you money. For a long time there has been Principal Residence Exemption. A couple buys a home, designates it as their principle residence, and sell it years later. There are no taxes on capital gains if the PRE is used. Until recently, the use of […]
March 9, 2017

Changes to the Principal Residence Exemption (Part 1 of 2)

There is a new reporting requirement for the Principal Residence Exemption (PRE). When you sell your principle residence and use the PRE, you have to report it.  First, I’ll discuss the PRE and in the next blog I’ll discuss the new report.  As tax is the largest payment one makes each year, it is a good idea to have your taxes reviewed by a tax accountant.   The Principal Residence Exemption is an opportunity to keep the capital gains tax-free on your principle residence that you have owed for longer than a year, and where you have lived for at […]
February 23, 2017

Big Changes for Small Business (Part 4 of 4)

On December 15th, 2016, Royal Assent was given to C-29, a budget implementation bill. C-29 means big changes for companies using the Small Business Deduction. Previously, I discussed the Small Business Deduction, who uses it, and what C-29 changed. Here,  I will briefly discuss the effects on small businesses. As always, consult a tax accountant to review your situation and for tax planning.   It used to be the biggest issue was Association: if two companies had 25% or more ownership in common, they were Associated, and had to share the $500,000 Small Business Deduction. Now, Specified Corporate Income goes […]
February 20, 2017

Big Changes for Small Business (Part 3 of 4)

As of December 2016, Bill C-29 is poised to make major changes to Small Business. In previous blogs, I discussed what the Small Business Deduction is, and what companies can use the Small Business Deduction. In this blog I’ll review the changes, and in the next blog I’ll discuss C-29’s impact. As always, talk to a tax accountant to review your particular situation and to get involved in tax planning. There is a new definition of Specified Corporate Income (new Section 125(7) of the Act). If two companies held by related owners do business with each other, that income won’t […]
November 27, 2016

How Bartering is Treated by Tax Law

In the normal course of business, bartering occurs. It is important to carefully approach this as the tax laws are strict. Basically, one should include the regular normal income as revenue and the cost of the barter as an expense. For example, let’s say John rents a basement apartment for $600 a month to Stuart. John and Stuart agree to cut the rent by $100 a month for snow removal, and lawn maintenance. It is a net of $500 income for John. The CRA wants to see the $600 and $100 figures in the income and expense areas, respectively. For […]
March 12, 2016

CRA’s AutoFill Return (AFR)

The CRA started a new AutoFill Return (AFR) service. Basically, the data the CRA has is downloaded into tax software. If one hires a tax preparer, make sure they have level 2 of the online access as it is required ( T1013 form). Is it faster? yes. However, there is no guarantee as to the quality of the information. For example, when I first used AFR for a client’s file I downloaded all the CRA information. All the data that had income (i.e. T4s, T5s) was downloaded. Good! However, a few deductions were missing. I guess the CRA missed those […]
March 15, 2015

Rental Payments and Bartering

If a landlord gives a discount on rent for services provided by the tenant, the full amounts must be reported. The normal rent must be reported, the discount may be claimed as an expense by the landlord and business income by the tenant. For example, say rent is $900 and the landlord offers $100 to shovel the walk to a tenant. The full $900 must be claimed as rent revenue, $100 as an expense by the landlord, and $100 business income by the tenant.
March 1, 2015

Taxable Dividends vs. Actual Dividends

If you look at a T5, one sees that taxable dividend amounts are greater than the actual dividend amounts. So, the government considers the actual dividends paid out to you less than what should be taxed. Why is that? The reason is that there should be only one level of taxes. In other words, you shouldn’t tax the same loonie multiple times. When a company makes money, it pays taxes on that income. Then, when it pays out a dividend with this after-tax income the shareholder has to pay taxes on it. That means two levels of taxation on the […]
February 8, 2015

What is on your T4?

Many items may be included on a T4. Employment income, taxable benefits, income eligible for EI and CPP, payroll deductions paid by the employer (i.e. EI and CPP), tax deducted, pensions, etc.   In most cases, T4s are prepared correctly. However, be careful and review them. Is there something you would expect but not there? Your tax preparer may not be able to catch T4 mistakes as the preparer may not have all the information concerning your employment. Some mistakes include missing CPP-eligible income, EI-eligible income, and missing car allowances.  
August 9, 2013

Time to Review Installments

By now, one should have the financial statements for the first two quarters of the year. Time to compare and contrast that with the installments registered with the CRA. If your business is doing better than expected, it may be time to increase your installments to avoid penalties and interest. If you business is easing down a bit (compared to your budgeted estimates), altering your installment registration with the CRA can reduce your taxes payable.